Dermer predicts end to Israeli-Arab conflict if Saudis join Abraham Accords
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Dermer predicts end to Israeli-Arab conflict if Saudis join Abraham Accords

Former Israeli Ambassador to the US was speaking at Sunday's StandWithUs UK event at St John’s Wood synagogue

Former Israeli ambassador to the US Ron Dermer (left) and political commentator and author Ed Husain at the StandWithUS UK event at St John's Wood Synagogue, 27 March, 2020
Former Israeli ambassador to the US Ron Dermer (left) and political commentator and author Ed Husain at the StandWithUS UK event at St John's Wood Synagogue, 27 March, 2020

Former Israeli Ambassador to the US Ron Dermer has said Saudi Arabia joining the Abraham Accords would mark the end of the Israeli-Arab conflict.

Speaking at a StandWithUs UK event at St John’s Wood synagogue on Sunday, Dermer noted the increasing number of Arab countries normalizing ties with Israel, including the UAE, Bahrain and Morocco.

Following the signing of the agreement with the UAE, then US president Donald Trump said Saudi Arabia could be one of the countries to follow suit.

Although this has not happened, on Sunday Dermer said: “When Israel is at peace with Saudi Arabia the Israeli-Arab conflict is over.”

Sunday saw StandWithUs UK host its first live event since the beginning of the pandemic.

Over 200 people heard speakers including Dermer and political commentator and author Ed Husain discuss issues including the Iran nuclear deal and the future of peace in the Middle East.

Hussain lauded Israel’s role in attempting to negotiate a peace settlement between Russia and Ukraine

“What we have today is an Israeli state that is negotiating between the Russians, Ukrainians and others, and that I think is the role for Israel, is being the biblical promise – ‘a light onto the nations’ – this is how you broker peace rather than take sides,” he said.

Dermer also spoke out against the nuclear deal that the P5+1 are currently negotiating with Iran, saying it poses a direct threat to the UK and the US as well as Israel.

Stressing Israel’s position, he said the deal does not block Iran’s path to a nuclear bomb, but “paves Iran’s path to a nuclear arsenal.”

“Iran is allowed to develop their nuclear programme under the deal. They can do research and development on advanced centrifuges. They’re working on their intercontinental ballistic missiles,” Dermer said.

“And last time I saw a map, Israel is on the same continent as Iran. Those ICBMs are not for Israel, they’re for you, they’re for America. And they’re quietly, slowly but surely, putting all the elements of their nuclear programme together.”

He added: “The best that can be said about the deal is that it makes it very unlikely that Iran would break out to a bomb in a decade

“The price of that is that it virtually guarantees that Iran will break out to a nuclear arsenal in the second decade while at the same time removing all of the sanctions which has hundreds of billions of dollars flowing into Iranian coffers.

Calling the deal “outrageous” Dermer compared the current negotiations to the 1938 Munich agreement between Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and Italy, widely seen as a classic example of appeasement.

“To have the leading powers in the world get together and to make such a deal is so outrageous in historical terms,” he said.

“It’s like Munich. It’s a disaster and makes the prospects for war much greater, between Israel and Iran and between our Sunni Arab neighbours and Iran because they will be flush with cash and continue their aggression. And it will nuclearize the Middle East.”

 

 

 

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